3/07/2012

(Luke 22:42 NIV) “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.”

“Yet not my will, but yours be done.”  We pray a similar prayer when we pray the Lord’s Prayer: “Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”  But what are we really praying?

When we pray “your will be done” we are praying that whatever God knows is right or best, will happen to us.  Soooo, if God knows it’s right/best that you get a promotion, then when you pray “your will be done” you are praying that you get a promotion. If God knows it’s right or best that you get better from your sickness, then when you pray “your will be done” you are praying that God heal you of your sickness.  If God knows it’s right/best that you get cancer, then when you pray “your will be done” you are praying that God give you cancer.  If God knows it’s right/ best for you to have a car accident, then when you pray “your will be done” you are praying that God would bring that car accident.  If God knows it’s best for you to be laid off of your job, then when you pray “your will be done” you are praying that you would be laid off.

“Hey!  Wait a minute!  Those things are uncomfortable, unpleasant!”

True.

But so was the cross.  And Jesus went there for you and for me.

Before Jesus went to the cross Jesus prayed that the Father’s will be done.  Jesus didn’t pray that only good things happen to him on the way to the cross.  He did not pray for God the Father to ease his suffering.  But he prayed, whether it was good or bad, that God’s will be done.  Jesus knew that the journey to the cross would not be easy.  He knew how difficult it would be.  Jesus was willing to undergo the unpleasant, the uncomfortable, the difficult, because that’s what was necessary to save you and to save me – that’s what was best for us!

Jesus prayed—and meant— “Your will be done.”

And because Jesus did so, we can pray “Your will be done” with joy and confidence.  The God who loves you and me so much, the God who loved us so much that he sent his Son to die for us, he will only do what’s best for us.  It may be unpleasant and difficult; it may be joyous and pleasant.  Either way, it will be for our good, to bring us closer to him, and to make sure that one day we end up with him in heaven!

Praying “Your will be done,” just like you,

Pastor Schumann

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